A Poet of Bangladesh’s Past and Present – a Tribute to Kazi Nazrul Islam on his 120th Birthday

I originally wrote this article for The Hague Peace Projects, where it was first published. “Of equality I sing: where all barriers and differences between man and man have vanished, where Hindus, Muslims, Buddhists, and Christians have mingled together.”[i] Bangladesh’s national poet, Kazi Nazrul Islam (*1899, †1976), sings of equality. He sings of peace. He … Continue reading A Poet of Bangladesh’s Past and Present – a Tribute to Kazi Nazrul Islam on his 120th Birthday

Why? – A Tribute to Avijit Roy and Bangladesh

Bengali-American author Avijit Roy lost his life on February 26th, 2015, in the streets of Dhaka after he was attacked with a machete. I recorded this piece as an attempt to be a cornerstone, a point of orientation, to grab hold of the many facets of the political and societal chaos Bangladesh has come to … Continue reading Why? – A Tribute to Avijit Roy and Bangladesh

A Political Culture Like a Bare-Knuckle Fight

This article was originally published on the website of The Hague Peace Projects as part of a 3-article series on the upcoming Bangladesh elections on December 30. Bangladesh until 1991 was a military regime (1). The traces of such former militarization are ever-present in society and crystallize through the need to stay in power that … Continue reading A Political Culture Like a Bare-Knuckle Fight

A Tribute to Nasser Zefzafi and the Rif

The following article was originally published on the website of The Hague Peace Projects. I interviewed a colleague, who had been involved with nominating Nasser Zefzafi. Her accounts are my primary source. The cover picture was taken by her colleague. Officially, Nasser Zefzafi was convicted for separatism; documents of his jailing condemn him for being … Continue reading A Tribute to Nasser Zefzafi and the Rif

How to Prevent Conflicts over Resources through your Lifestyle

The single most effective way to reduce our tendency to buy products that fuel civil wars and fights over livelihoods is to combat our general consumerism. The tendency to spend on leisure products and indulge on items that are not actually essential leads us to buy whatever is offered to us and to prefer cheap items over ethical ones. I personally urge governments to act and impose restrictions on the available products in shop and incentivize a lifestyle that is long overdue. Until then, it seems to be left up to us to act according to the urgency that is required.

Bangladesh in the Human Rights Council: Why it is Ironic – a Legal Analysis

This article was originally published on the website of The Hague Peace Projects on October 15, 2018. On Friday, October 12th 2018, Bangladesh was elected to serve on the Human Rights Council of the United Nations. Countries are frequently rotating within the Council to create a dynamic environment and engage in globally democracy. Hopes are high that … Continue reading Bangladesh in the Human Rights Council: Why it is Ironic – a Legal Analysis

The power politics of law enforcement: Arrest of prominent photographer Shahidul under the unlawful ICT Act

This article was originally published on the website of The Hague Peace Projects on October 1, 2018.   After the death of two students in a road accident in late July 2018, protests sparked in Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka, with tens out thousands of students not only protesting the lack of government effort to prevent thousands … Continue reading The power politics of law enforcement: Arrest of prominent photographer Shahidul under the unlawful ICT Act